Friday, August 26, 2016

KNOW YOUR HORSE COLORS


o areas of the body—the main body and the points, which are the ear tips, mane, tail, and the fetlock or the lower part of the legs—are considered when determining the color of a horse. (This gets a little complicated because color designations differ between UK and the US.)
Appaloosa


Appaloosa – white hair and dark patches that may be leopard, flecked, snowflake or  in a blanket. These originated in northwestern US and were formerly much  used by Native Americans.









Bay


Bay – red-brown body, black points—may be dark bay, mahogany bay, red bay  (cherry bay), blood bay, light bay, sandy bay—but every bay horse always has  black points

Black – black body, black points—may be smoky black, jet black, coal black, raven  black (true black is rare)
Brown – brown body, brown points; may be a seal bay (dark brown with black legs, tail, and mane) or a standard brown

Chestnut





Chestnut/Sorrel – reddish body, self-colored (non-black) points. When in UK refer to Thoroughbreds or Arabians as chestnuts—a liver chestnut, dark red  chestnut, dark chestnut, etc.  In the West, “sorrel” designates light reds;  medium or dark reds may be called “chestnut.” Some Western  horsemen use  “sorrel” for all red horses no matter the shade. Light sorrel draft horses with  white manes and tails are known as “blond.”



Dun



Dun – yellowish body, black points; may have primitive marks, which include a  black dorsal stripe and/or zebra stripes onthe legs; a red dun is a name often  used for a reddish yellow horse with red points and primitive marks; a grullo  is slate-blue with black points;  and a claybank is a pale dun color without  black points. Duns are called buckskins in the US, and even piebald or  skewbald.




Dappled Gray





Gray – may be born black or bay, but each year shows more white—iron grey, steel grey, dappled grey, etc. A “rose grey” is born chestnut or bay.










Paint


Paint/Pinto – white patches patterned as either Overo (white patches have ragged edges and  rarely extend over the top-line) or Tobiano (white patches have sharp edges  and cross the top-line and usually with white legs)






Palomino



Palomino golden coat, white mane and tail; palomino with a cream-colored coat rather than gold, is called an Isabella—a term often used in Europe for all palominos








Piebald




Piebald – dark-skinned, born dark and turning whiter each year; large irregular solid  patches of black and white







Roan







Roan – can be blue or strawberry; mixed colored and white hairs, staying the same  every year after one year old. A blue roan has black and white hairs; red roans  and strawberry roans have red and white hairs. A thoroughbred born chestnut  may be called a “red roan” even when truly gray—getting progressively  whiter each year
Skewbald














Skewbald – large irregular solid patches of any other color and white
White














White – pure white with pink skin; in western US white and off-white horses with blue  eyes are called cremello or if it has slightly red or blue points, it’s called a perlino (true white is rare)





KNOW YOUR HORSE COLORS


o areas of the body—the main body and the points, which are the ear tips, mane, tail, and the fetlock or the lower part of the legs—are considered when determining the color of a horse. (This gets a little complicated because color designations differ between UK and the US.)
Appaloosa

Appaloosa – white hair and dark patches that may be leopard, flecked, snowflake or  in a blanket. These originated in northwestern US and were formerly much  used by Native Americans.








Bay


Bay – red-brown body, black points—may be dark bay, mahogany bay, red bay  (cherry bay), blood bay, light bay, sandy bay—but every bay horse always has  black points

Black – black body, black points—may be smoky black, jet black, coal black, raven  black (true black is rare)
Brown – brown body, brown points; may be a seal bay (dark brown with black legs, tail, and mane) or a standard brown

Chestnut





Chestnut/Sorrel – reddish body, self-colored (non-black) points. When in UK refer to Thoroughbreds or Arabians as chestnuts—a liver chestnut, dark red  chestnut, dark chestnut, etc.  In the West, “sorrel” designates light reds;  medium or dark reds may be called “chestnut.” Some Western  horsemen use  “sorrel” for all red horses no matter the shade. Light sorrel draft horses with  white manes and tails are known as “blond.”



Dun



Dun – yellowish body, black points; may have primitive marks, which include a  black dorsal stripe and/or zebra stripes onthe legs; a red dun is a name often  used for a reddish yellow horse with red points and primitive marks; a grullo  is slate-blue with black points;  and a claybank is a pale dun color without  black points. Duns are called buckskins in the US, and even piebald or  skewbald.




Dappled Gray





Gray – may be born black or bay, but each year shows more white—iron grey, steel grey, dappled grey, etc. A “rose grey” is born chestnut or bay.










Paint


Paint/Pinto – white patches patterned as either Overo (white patches have ragged edges and  rarely extend over the top-line) or Tobiano (white patches have sharp edges  and cross the top-line and usually with white legs)






Palomino



Palomino golden coat, white mane and tail; palomino with a cream-colored coat rather than gold, is called an Isabella—a term often used in Europe for all palominos








Piebald




Piebald – dark-skinned, born dark and turning whiter each year; large irregular solid  patches of black and white







Roan







Roan – can be blue or strawberry; mixed colored and white hairs, staying the same  every year after one year old. A blue roan has black and white hairs; red roans  and strawberry roans have red and white hairs. A thoroughbred born chestnut  may be called a “red roan” even when truly gray—getting progressively  whiter each year
Skewbald














Skewbald – large irregular solid patches of any other color and white
White














White – pure white with pink skin; in western US white and off-white horses with blue  eyes are called cremello or if it has slightly red or blue points, it’s called a perlino (true white is rare)





Tuesday, August 23, 2016

A Writer's Guide to Horses


Today, I'm bringing you information about horses from the website,  An Equestrian Writer’s Guide, by Susan F. Craft. This is a wonderful site for authors to learn all about horses. 


Mare – female horse
Gelding – castrated male horse
Stallion – male horse; also called an “entire”; in the US he may be called a “stud horse”; but never called a stud by the English, which is what they call a farm or stable that keeps horses. Stallions have more natural aggression especially around other  horses; usually ridden by experts.
Foal – baby horse from birth to January 1 of the next year (horses mature between ages five and seven)
Filly – girl baby horse
Colt – boy baby horse
Yearling – in the year after the birth year (too young to ride; most saddle horses aren't  worked hard until at least four years old; breaking and training may start earlier)
Pony – small, usually less than 14.2 hands high. Smart and sturdy, they are often   used by ladies in pony carts or carriages, or for packing goods.
 
Height
 
Horses are measured from the ground to the top of the withers (the ridge between the shoulder bones) in hands. One hand is four inches.
 
The average horse is 15 to 16 hands. Very tall horses may be 17 hands, and only unusual horses reach 18 hands.
 
Ponies are usually less than 14 hands, two inches


Colour
 
Two areas of the body—the main body and the points, which are the ear tips, mane, tail, and the fetlock or the lower part of the legs—are considered when determining the color of a horse. (This gets a little complicated because color designations differ between UK and the US.)
 
Appaloosa – white hair and dark patches that may be leopard, flecked, snowflake or  in a blanket. These originated in northwestern US and were formerly much  used by Native Americans.
Bay – red-brown body, black points—may be dark bay, mahogany bay, red bay  (cherry bay), blood bay, light bay, sandy bay—but every bay horse always has  black points
Black – black body, black points—may be smoky black, jet black, coal black, raven  black (true black is rare)
Brown – brown body, brown points; may be a seal bay (dark brown with black legs, tail, and mane) or a standard brown
Chestnut/Sorrel – reddish body, self-colored (non-black) points. When in UK refer to Thoroughbreds or Arabians as chestnuts—a liver chestnut, dark red  chestnut, dark chestnut, etc.  In the West, “sorrel” designates light reds;  medium or dark reds may be called “chestnut.” Some Western  horsemen use  “sorrel” for all red horses no matter the shade. Light sorrel draft horses with  white manes and tails are known as “blond.”
Dun – yellowish body, black points; may have primitive marks, which include a  black dorsal stripe and/or zebra stripes on the legs; a red dun is a name often  used for a reddish yellow horse with red points and primitive marks; a grullo  is slate-blue with black points;  and a claybank is a pale dun color without  black points. Duns are called buckskins in the US, and even piebald or  skewbald.
Gray – may be born black or bay, but each year shows more white—iron grey, steel grey, dappled grey, etc. A “rose grey” is born chestnut or bay.
Paint/Pinto – white patches patterned as either Overo (white patches have ragged edges and  rarely extend over the top-line) or Tobiano (white patches have sharp edges  and cross the top-line and usually with white legs)
Palomino golden coat, white mane and tail; palomino with a cream-colored coat rather than gold, is called an Isabella—a term often used in Europe for all palominos
Piebald – dark-skinned, born dark and turning whiter each year; large irregular solid  patches of black and white
Roan – can be blue or strawberry; mixed colored and white hairs, staying the same  every year after one year old. A blue roan has black and white hairs; red roans  and strawberry roans have red and white hairs. A thoroughbred born chestnut  may be called a “red roan” even when truly gray—getting progressively  whiter each year
Skewbald – large irregular solid patches of any other color and white
White – pure white with pink skin; in western US white and off-white horses with blue  eyes are called cremello or if it has slightly red or blue points, it’s called a perlino (true white is rare)

Stay tuned for more next time.


Saturday, August 20, 2016

NEW STORY AVAILABLE SOON

At last I have a new story that will be available Sept 1. The Good, The Bad, and the Ghostly is a western historical romance anthology and is up for pre-order now. For a free sample book with excerpts from the eight various stories, plus other ghost tales and recipes from each author, leave your email address in a comment below.

https://www.amazon.com/Good-Bad-Ghostly-Western-Romance-ebook/dp/B01KKVK9BI/

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Monday, August 1, 2016

Shell Grotto, Kent, UK



Buried deep underground in the small English town of  Margate, Kent; is a grotto shrouded in complete mystery. Adorned with 4.6 million shells and 70ft of winding underground passages leading to a rectangular chamber, this shell grotto is undoubtedly a remarkable site to behold.
The story has it that in 1835, a laborer was going about his usual field work, but when he struck the soil with his spade, it sank into the earth. The farmer realized that he was standing on something hollow, but was unable to see anything from the surface. Word spread around town, and a local school teacher volunteered his young son, Joshua, to be lowered into the hole with a candle. Upon emerging from the mysterious cavern, Joshua described rooms filled with hundreds of thousands of carefully arranged shells. 
 








The Shell Grotto is adorned with symbols mosaiced in millions of shells, symbols that celebrate life as well as reminders of death. It hosts a passage, a rotunda, and an altar chamber.

The shells include scallops, whelks, mussels, cockles, limpets and oysters, all of which can be found locally. However, the flat wrinkle shells must have been brought in from elsewhere. With so much intricate detail, on a rather larger scale, one question still remains, who built this underground cavern? Shrouded in mystery, some believe that the grotto once had religious significance -primarily due to the vaulted ceilings and altar spaces. Nobody knows how old the grotto is, but some theories about its origin date its constructions as far back as 3000 years ago.
Another theory holds that the grotto was created as an aristocrat's folly sometime in the 1700s. This proposed explanation is validated by the fact that shell grottoes were actually quite popular in  Europe in the 1700s, especially among the wealthy. The only catch to this theory, though, is that the grotto's location was on farmland - a land that had never been part of a large estate where follies would have been satisfied.
Others believe that it may have been used as an astrological calendar in the past.
There are those also, who say that the grotto must somehow be connected with the Freemasons or the Knights Templar.
Others believe that the grotto may date as far back as 12,000 years ago, maintaining that it is connected to a mysterious Mexican culture.


Its mystery has left people completely stumped, so much so that in the 1930s, some had held séances, in the hopes of contacting the spirits of whoever built the grotto.
Right now, it seems, we will not discover the truth behind this mysterious shell grotto. The age of the shells could be determined through carbon dating according to the Shell's Grotto website, but it's a pricey process, and other conservation issues are currently being prioritized. 

One thing is clear, though, the arrangement of the shells must have taken countless hours of painstaking work.
Unfortunately, many of the shells in the grotto have faded over time, losing their luster through water damage. In its early days, it would have been full of dazzling color. This recreation shows what they might have looked like at the time, and with over 4.6 million shells, it surely must have looked astonishing! 

Since its discovery, the Margate Shell Grott has been opened to the public, first by Joshua's father, the school teacher. In 1835 he quickly bought up the land and began renovating the grotto to make it suitable for visitors. Two years later, in 1837, the grotto had been opened to the public for the first time and still enjoys visitors today.